Forex Trading Online Offers Investors a Complete and Direct Access to Worldwide Foreign Currency

Forex trading software was first introduced in the year 1994 for trading via the Internet. In comparison to the dollar the value of Euro was more. So Euro was launched in 2002 and spread to 12 countries. Therefore, forex trading became easy for anyone have a personal computer with access to the Internet.

One needs to understand what this trading is all about. It deals with foreign exchange that is forex. It is also the principal economic center on foreign currencies handling business worth millions of dollars. Forex is an acronym for foreign exchange. This trading is a process where all the business works are done in the day itself. For example, it is like buying Euros and at the same time selling USD.

Use of the Internet on forex trading

A very small percentage of people or agents having knowledge on forex trading with the help of forex trading software do this business sitting in their apartments using a notebook.

High percentage of business dealings are carried out by big banks and establishments dealing with finance. A good amount of revenue is earned by the public. Based on the fundamental theory of forex trading one can earn huge profits. It is pertinent to note that forex trading is an activity involving high risk also. This trading is done generally through a broker.

Forecast in forex trading

Systematic forecast of prospective market activity is another important factor in forex trading online. A lot of endeavor goes behind this to find out the effects and defects.

Like the share market, the field of trade in foreign currencies, are done during the daytime. In this trade buying and selling takes place during the day though it is very risky but profitable.

How to make profits?

We have to keep an eye on the changing pattern involved in the trade. The forex trader can persistently invest till he is satisfied as no one can forecast the short term.

One can be a very rich person if forex trading is operated in the correct manner by using the genuine forex trading platforms so much so with the gainful understanding that was gathered in this business.

SEC Changes Course and Allows Business Brokers to Receive Commissions on Business Stock Sales

Prior to 1985, the SEC did not consider the sale of a business structured as a stock sale to be a sale of securities under the securities laws. This was known as the Sale of Business Doctrine. As a result, the penalties and rules that apply to securities sales did not apply to the sale of a business, and business brokers and merger and acquisition brokers were able to receive commissions in connections with those sales without being registered as a broker dealer. This changed in 1985 when the Supreme Court of the United States took the position that the sale of a business structured as a stock sale was indeed the sale of securities. As a result, business brokers and merger and acquisition brokers were prohibited from earning commissions in connection with those sales unless they were registered as a broker dealer. This created substantial implications for business brokers and mergers and acquisition brokers, especially where a transaction started out structured as a sale of assets and then during the course of negotiations, the transaction was restructured to be a sale of stock. In that case, business brokers and merger and acquisition brokers that were not registered as broker dealers were theoretically prohibited from earning a commission, simply because the structure of the transaction had changed. This result was often thought of as unfair in the industry.

The ABA task force on private placement broker dealers noted in its year 2000 final report that the broker dealer registration process involved significant costs as well as a regulatory model that is not the right size to accommodate the particular role played by business brokers in connection with the sale of a business. The requirement to register as a broker dealer is a lengthy process and there are substantial costs and fees, together with start up and first year expenses, including legal, accounting, and operating costs that can equal several hundred thousand dollars. Persons effecting one or several transactions a year simply cannot bear this financial burden. These firms do not hold customer funds or securities and generally they merely introduce the parties to one another and transmit documents between the parties. They do not participate in structuring or negotiating these transactions or otherwise advise the parties. Both buyers and sellers in this type of transaction are typically represented by legal counsel who can assist with due diligence, draft the transactional documents and advise their clients on structure, tax considerations and contractual provisions and there are remedies, both contractual and by operation of law, that are available to the parties in these types of transactions.

On January 31, 2014, the SEC changed its mind about these matters and issued a long awaited no action letter permitting certain merger and acquisition brokers to receive commissions in connection with the sale of a business even where the sale is structured as a stock sale.

Under the new interpretation, merger and acquisition brokers are permitted to facilitate acquisitions, mergers, business sales, and business combinations on behalf of buyers and sellers of privately-held companies and receive commissions in connection with the transaction. Moreover, the letter does not limit the amount or type of compensation that a merger and acquisition broker may receive, and it does not limit the size of the privately-held company. The letter also permits merger and acquisition brokers to advertise the sale of a privately-held company and include in such advertisements a description, general location and price range of the business.

For purposes of this letter ruling, a privately-held company is one that does not have any class of securities registered or required to be registered with the SEC under Section 12 of The Exchange Act or to which it is required to file periodic reports under Section 15(d) of The Exchange Act. Also the company must be a going concern and not a shell company.

As is so often the case in these matters, there is a catch. In this case, the catch is that the relief available under this no action letter is only available if the transaction satisfies ten (10) very specific conditions.

Those conditions are as follows:

1. The “merger and acquisition broker” must not have the ability to bind a party to a merger and acquisition transaction. A “mergers and acquisition broker” for the purpose of the letter is a person engaged in the business of effecting the securities transaction solely in connection with the transfer of ownership and control of a privately-held company through the purchase, sale, exchange, issuance, repurchase, or redemption of, or business combination involving securities or assets of the company, to a buyer that will actively operate the company or the business with the assets of the acquired company.

2. The merger and acquisition broker must not directly or indirectly through any of its affiliates provide financing for the merger and acquisition transaction. The merger and acquisition broker may assist the purchaser in obtaining financing from an unaffiliated third party but they must comply with all applicable legal requirements and disclose to their client, in writing, the receipt of any compensation in connection with the financing.

3. The mergers and acquisition broker is prohibited from having custody, control or possession of or otherwise handling funds or securities issued or exchanged in connection with the merger and acquisition transaction or other securities transactions for the account of others. The merger and acquisition transaction cannot involve a public offering. Any offering of securities must be conducted in compliance with an applicable exemption from registration.

4. No party to a merger and acquisition transaction may be a shell company, other than a business combination related company.

5. If a merger and acquisition broker represents both the buyer and the seller in a transaction it must provide clear written disclosure of the potential conflict to the parties it represents and it must obtain written consent from both parties to the joint representation.

6. A merger and acquisition broker may only facilitate a merger and acquisition transaction with a group of buyers if the group is formed without the assistance of the merger and acquisition broker.

7. Buyers or a group of buyers in a merger and acquisition transaction must control and actively operate the business acquired with the assets of that business. In this regard, control will be considered to be achieved if the buyers have the power directly or indirectly to manage the company or the policies of the company through ownership of securities by contract or otherwise. Under the view of the SEC, a buyer could be considered to actively operate an acquired company simply by possessing the power to elect executive officers and approve annual budgets or by service as an executive or other executive manager, among other things. The necessary control will be presumed if at the completion of the transaction the buyer or group of buyers has the right to vote 25% or more of the class of voting securities; has the power to sell or direct the sale of 25% or more of a class of voting securities; or in the case of a partnership or limited liability company has the right to receive, upon dissolution 25% or more of the proceeds from the dissolution, or has contributed 5% or more of the capital to the transaction. In addition, the buyer or a group of buyers must actively operate the company or the business acquired with the assets of the company.

8. No merger and acquisition transaction can result in the transfer of interests to a passive buyer or a group of passive buyers.

9. Any securities received by the buyer in the merger and acquisition transaction will be restricted securities within the meaning of Rule 144(a)(3) of The Securities Act.

10. A merger and acquisition broker must meet the following conditions:

(a) The broker has not been barred from association with a broker dealer by the SEC or any state or self-regulatory organization.

(b) The broker must not be suspended from association with a broker dealer.

These rules make very clear who will be entitled to the exemption provided in the no action letter. As a result of these changes, business brokers and merger and acquisition brokers will no longer have to worry whether or not they will be able to receive their commission in the event that a transaction is ultimately cast as a stock purchase. The SEC’s actions in this instance are grounded in an understanding of the realities of the typical sale of business transaction. The truth is that those transactions are structured on the basis of accounting or tax considerations, and not on the application of federal securities laws. The sale of a business between sellers and buyers of privately-owned companies are qualitatively different in virtually every respect from traditional retail or institutional brokerage transactions.

We are encouraged that the SEC recognized these distinctions. This decision will clarify a tricky area of the law and provide appropriate relief to business brokers and mergers and acquisition brokers who work in this area.

Starting a Home Based Business With Business Opportunities

When we think of home business, we can often get misconceptions that home based business is all about starting a home business of your own from scratch. The truth is that there are many home business opportunities that can help you easily get into a home based business of your own, and start making money.

Reading every word of this article will result in you discovering:

* The Benefits Of Starting A Home Based Business From Scratch
* The Benefits Of Starting In A Business Opportunity?
* Making Your Choice For Success

* The Benefits Of Starting A Home Based Business From Scratch

Though home business opportunities are easy to get started with, there are several benefits of starting with your own home based business ideas.

The biggest benefit is that your idea may benefit mankind or at least a portion of it. If your home based business ideas are ideas that people want in products or services, then it may be best to pursue the idea.

However, there is a warning. And that is that ideas are a dime a dozen – literally! Everyone has ideas, and you have to judge your idea with no bias. If you can do market research and find people want this product or service, then you may be onto a winner.

* The Benefits Of Starting In A Business Opportunity?

Start a home business with your own idea can take time. This time you need to invest initially in market research, then planning. This could take weeks, it could take months. The result is that some people can’t wait this long to get there first customers.

Home business opportunities allow you to cut out this time for planning and market research. In a home based business opportunity, you can easily join, and get started in days rather than weeks or months. Investment levels are generally small and potential is big.

Home business opportunities also give you all the information you need. They generally give you support and a system that works, when you work it.

* Making Your Choice For Success

Now is the time for action and success. There must come a point when you decide. And this decision is either going to be towards your own home based business ideas or a home business opportunity.

How you make your choice will come down to your needs. For some people a home business opportunity is no good because it doesn’t give them what they always wanted – a way to bring there creativity to the world, with there own product, service or invention.

For many the prospect of having potential to create a future nest egg, for themselves and their families, is a big must. So, in this case home business opportunities can be a great way to make that happen and faster. Remember home business opportunities still need research, however; generally the time saving is much better than with home based business ideas.

Small Business Insurance Basics: 10 Things You Need to Know Now

When you hear the words “business insurance,” you might think this only applies to large, established businesses. But in fact, this is an important topic for any sized business – from the largest corporations to the smallest, one-person operation and everything in between.

Whether you’re simply in the beginning stages of getting a business idea up and running, or already own an established business, it’s important to know a few basic things about how business insurance works, and what kinds you might need. Here are a few tips to get you started – or to provide you with a quick review.

1. Property Insurance – understand what it covers

Property insurance covers not only the physical structure which houses your business, but also the contents inside the structure. This could include equipment, office furniture and even inventory.

2. Liability Insurance is a must

No one likes to think about it, but getting sued is always a possibility for a business, regardless of its size. Having the proper amount of liability insurance is of the utmost importance. Liability insurance can help with expenses if your business is sued, but it can also help pay for expenses if anyone is injured due to a faulty product or service.

3. Worker’s Comp – check your state’s requirements

If your business has employees, it’s very possible that you’ll need worker’s compensation insurance. If anyone is injured on the job while working for you, worker’s compensation insurance will help pay for medical expenses. Most states require worker’s comp for all sized businesses, but be sure to check your state’s requirements to be sure that you get the proper type – and amount – of coverage.

4. Errors & Omissions

E&O Insurance is similar to Liability Insurance, but it is specifically for professional services businesses. This type of insurance can cover expenses that may be incurred due to accusations of negligence, or the failure to perform your professional services. Even if you haven’t.

5. Got employees? Consider EPLI

Employment Practices Liability Insurance applies to situations where businesses are sued for things such as discrimination, sexual harassment, or wrongful termination. At one time, these topics were only of concern to larger companies, but in today’s environment, businesses of all sizes can be subject to these types of suits. If your business has employees, it’s wise to consider adding EPLI coverage to your Business Owner’s Policy (BOP, described below).

6. Is Key Employee Insurance worth your while?

Many times, the success of a business relies on the involvement of specific employees. If one of those employees were to pass away unexpectedly, their absence could affect the profitability of the business. The beneficiary of a key employee policy is the business itself. Key Employee policies can often be requested by lenders, to meet certain credit requirements.

7. Cyber Liability Insurance is gaining in popularity

More and more business is being transacted online. And more and more data are being stored in “the cloud,” allowing for ease of access and reducing the need for companies to invest in storage or storage facilities. However, as more business is transacted electronically, the more that information is opened up to theft and hacking. Cyber Liability Insurance will help protect businesses if they experience a data breach; it will help cover costs ranging from legal expenses to public relations expenses.

8. Directors & Officers Liability Insurance is NOT the same as E&O

As the name implies, D&O insurance specifically protects the directors and officers of a company. D&O insurance protects the business, and sometimes the directors and officers themselves, in the event of legal action brought for alleged wrongful acts. While lawsuits such as these are less common in the United States, if your business operates outside the U.S. this type of coverage is definitely worth investigating further.

9. Don’t forget about the car!

If you have vehicles that are owned by your business, and are used exclusively for running your business, they won’t be covered by personal car insurance; a separate business auto insurance policy is needed. There are many types of coverage available, and auto insurance can sometimes be bundled into your Business Owner’s Policy. However, individual plans can be more easily customized.

10. Consider a BOP

A Business Owner’s Policy can be a great way to bundle common types of business insurance into one handy policy. BOPs are customizable, and can save you money since there are multiple types of coverage combined into one policy. Purchasing a BOP can also simplify the insurance process, since you’ll have just one policy, one renewal date, and one premium payment to deal with. While combining policies can be extremely convenient, it should only be done if you can truly have all of your insurance needs met by one product. If your business is of an unusual nature, or you have specific insurance needs, it might be best to still consider individual policies. Working with a trusted insurance agent or broker will help you ensure you’re getting all of your business insurance needs taken care of.